Browsing all articles tagged with heart disease
FIT
17

Working Out Prevents Cancer in Women

Two of the most common cancers in women are breast and endometrial cancer. These are hormonally caused cancers that are caused by hormones going out of whack.  Exercise can help with these “female” cancers because physical activity has been shown to regulate and calm the production, metabolism and elimination of the toxins produced by female hormones running amok.

 

 

Studies have also shown that there is a relationship between being fatter and breast and endometrial cancer.  Exercise obviously can help you lose weight so you do not become more susceptible to developing these hormonally based cancers.

This past fall, a Canadian study found that the women who were least likely to develop breast cancer engaged in the moderate exercise of doing daily household or farming chores.  Researchers concluded that it was not so much the intensity of the exercise that was helping, but rather the regularity of it.

 

 

In 2009,  a massive study, based on questionnaires given to 121,701 women over twenty years was conducted by the Nurses Health Study at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Boston. This study found that women who worked out between two to four hours a week reduced their chances of getting cancer by twenty percent.  A smaller but similar study done in Norway in 1997 found the same thing. Women who exercised four hours a week were about one third less likely to get breast cancer.

 

 

In the Brigham study it was noted that the exercise reduces the level of circulating estrogens in a woman’s body.  The reason that this is negative is because estrogen stimulates the growth of breast cells which could mutate and cause cancer.

 

 

Women are actually vulnerable to these types of cancers their entire life. The most important thing is to exercise in moderation because if you exercise to the point that you have minimized your estrogen levels you can increase your risk of bone loss and heart disease.

Menopausal and post-menopausal women are at particular risk for cancer because they are overproducing and under producing hormones. Exercise has protective benefits for hormonal women because it helps to reduce fat.

 

 

The idea is that the leaner you are, the less natural estrogens you will produce. The less estrogens that are in the body, the less of a welcoming field your changing body will be to developing cancer.

You do not have to work out like a female fitness model. Simple, yet sustained activity is best . Try walking or cycling. As long as you working out consistently and every day you should be giving your body the edge when it comes to preventing breast or ovarian cancer.

FIT
11

Is Heart Disease Hereditary?

Yes! You can inherit a predilection to heart disease but thankfully there are ways around the condition.  You may have a little more control over the situation than you think if you pay attention to your fitness.

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As an example, there is evidence that if your family has a history of coronary artery disease at an early age (younger than 55 in men and 65 in women), your risk of suffering heart disease is increased, with some sources suggesting that this single factor could represent up to 15% of your susceptibility to heart disease.

 

 

However you may be relieved or upset to hear that it is actually a combination of conditions that can play a far more important role in determining how healthy your heart remains.

 

 

For instance, diabetes, high blood pressure, obesity and cholesterol abnormalities are all factors which play an important role in determining whether you will suffer heart problems or not. If you bring diabetes onto yourself by living an unhealthy lifestyle then you very well might develop heart disease sooner than later than life.

 

 

It is for example widely recognized within medical circles that one of the reasons behind the explosion in childhood diabetes over the past two or three decades has been the vast increase in sugar intake.

For people who have a family history of diabetes however, there is no need for this massive sugar overdose for them to suffer the condition. It is a genetic thing rather than something that is caused by greed and overindulgence.

 

In many situations, there may therefore be an established link between illnesses and medical problems suffered by parents and the likelihood of their offspring suffering heart problems at some point.

 

 

If you know that one or both of your parents suffered diabetes and that your chances of suffering the condition are therefore increased, logic suggests that you have a superb early warning system in place.

You know that your chances of getting diabetes are higher than normal, you know that excessive sugar speeds the onset of diabetes and you are fully well aware that diabetes is a contributory factor to heart disease.

 

 

This is positive because you have a clear warning about the disease an idea of what you need to do in order to prevent the onset of diabetes and then the heart problems that usually follow it.

 

 

So, yes, there is an element of genetics involved in the likelihood of you contracting some form of heart disease or problem.

But once you know this you can use the information to help yourself avoid the entire ordeal of heart disease altogether.