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FIT
14

Working Out Before You Play Golf

You shouldn’t have to be worrying about whether you can physically handle it before you step foot on a golf green. However that is exactly what happens if you are not fit before you play golf. Golf is a long game. Golf can wear you out. You need to bend over a lot and pick up balls. If you are overweight this might be a big issue for you;You also don’t want to be out of breath, sweating because of the exertion of pulling the cart around the green. If you examine the physiques of most professional players you will notice that they are taut and fit and lean before they enter the green.

 

 

Studies on performance  have shown that one way golfers can improve their performance on the green is by embarking on a program of  weight training. This is because weight-training exercises can noticeably improve personal muscle strength and hip and shoulder flexibility. Lifting weights up and down can help improve the health.

 

 

Professionals also work out with weights to increase the speed with which they can hit the ball. This is because a golf ball needs lean muscle to drive it, not flab. Believe it or not, upper arm flab can actually slow down the speed of a golf swing. This is because the golf club itself is an extension of your arm and your drive and the force with which you can whack the ball.

 

 

If you are an amateur who wants to play like a professional your best course of action is to put yourself on a program of regular exercise that is a combination of  different kinds of exrcise.  However be sure to include the weight lifting.. It is recommended that you do three sets of the usual weight lifting and resistance training exercises that are prescribed by most trainer at gyms and work out clubs.  If you do three sets than these three times a week for 2 1/2 hours then you will substantially improve your game.

 

 

If you find it difficult to fit weightlifting into your schedule then one way to cut down your work out time might be to buy a home workout bench. f you work out every day for twenty minutes on a home gym then you will get the same results as if you had spent a couple of hours, three days a week at a professional club.

FIT
11

Is Heart Disease Hereditary?

Yes! You can inherit a predilection to heart disease but thankfully there are ways around the condition.  You may have a little more control over the situation than you think if you pay attention to your fitness.

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As an example, there is evidence that if your family has a history of coronary artery disease at an early age (younger than 55 in men and 65 in women), your risk of suffering heart disease is increased, with some sources suggesting that this single factor could represent up to 15% of your susceptibility to heart disease.

 

 

However you may be relieved or upset to hear that it is actually a combination of conditions that can play a far more important role in determining how healthy your heart remains.

 

 

For instance, diabetes, high blood pressure, obesity and cholesterol abnormalities are all factors which play an important role in determining whether you will suffer heart problems or not. If you bring diabetes onto yourself by living an unhealthy lifestyle then you very well might develop heart disease sooner than later than life.

 

 

It is for example widely recognized within medical circles that one of the reasons behind the explosion in childhood diabetes over the past two or three decades has been the vast increase in sugar intake.

For people who have a family history of diabetes however, there is no need for this massive sugar overdose for them to suffer the condition. It is a genetic thing rather than something that is caused by greed and overindulgence.

 

In many situations, there may therefore be an established link between illnesses and medical problems suffered by parents and the likelihood of their offspring suffering heart problems at some point.

 

 

If you know that one or both of your parents suffered diabetes and that your chances of suffering the condition are therefore increased, logic suggests that you have a superb early warning system in place.

You know that your chances of getting diabetes are higher than normal, you know that excessive sugar speeds the onset of diabetes and you are fully well aware that diabetes is a contributory factor to heart disease.

 

 

This is positive because you have a clear warning about the disease an idea of what you need to do in order to prevent the onset of diabetes and then the heart problems that usually follow it.

 

 

So, yes, there is an element of genetics involved in the likelihood of you contracting some form of heart disease or problem.

But once you know this you can use the information to help yourself avoid the entire ordeal of heart disease altogether.